Gathering Research And Stories of Paranormal Phenomena

Researching Everything Paranormal

* ghost * spirit * bigfoot * ufo * cryptid * alien * dogman * mothman *

Bigfoot & Cryptids​

Beginning the summer of 2020, covid-19 permitting, G.R.A.S.P.P. will start our training in the field of cryptid research. We will be investigating sightings of Bigfoot, Yeti's, Dogman, Mothman and any other cryptids that may be reported in the Michigan area. Our goals will be to find proof or explanation of their existence.  


Exactly what is a cryptid, you ask? According to the Oxford Dictionary, a Cryptid is defined as " An animal whose existence or survival is disputed or unsubstantiated, such as the yeti ."


We currently have a few resources for experts in this field to help guide us in the right direction and also offer advice and information to you, if needed. Please feel free to send us any experiences, encounters, photos, videos and questions you may have. We will do our best to answer your questions and post your experiences and evidence (that is, if you'd like us to) on this page!


We are also looking for researchers in this field, with or without experience. If your interested, please contact us for more information.


[email protected]


The Legend of the Dogman!

The Dogman Legend

In Michigan folklore, stories of the Michigan Dogman were allegedly witnessed in 1887 in Wexford County, Michigan. The creature is described to be a seven-foot tall, having blue-eyes or amber-eyes, also being a bipedal canine-like animal with the torso of a man and a fearsome howl that sounds like a person’s scream. According to legends, the Michigan Dogman appears only in years ending in 7. Sightings have been reported in several locations throughout Michigan, primarily in the northwestern quadrant of the Lower Peninsula.

The Dogman was unknown to most of the modern world until late in the twentieth century. It is said to have been stalking the areas around the Manistee River since the days when the Odawa tribes lived there.

The first alleged encounter of the Michigan Dogman occurred in 1887 in Wexford County, when two lumberjacks saw a creature which they described as having a man's body and a dog's head. In 1937 in Paris, Michigan, Robert Fortney was attacked by five wild dogs and said that one of the five walked on two legs. Reports of similar creatures also came from Allegan County in the 1950s, and in Manistee and Cross Village in 1967.

Linda S. Godfrey, in her book “The Beast of Bray Road”, compares the Manistee sightings to a similar creature sighted in Wisconsin known as the Beast of Bray Road.

In 1987, the legend of the Michigan Dogman gained popularity when disc jockey Steve Cook at WTCM-FM (Traverse City, MI.) recorded a song about the creature and its reported sightings titled "The Legend", which he initially played as an April Fool's Day joke. He based the songs on myths and legends from around North America, and had never heard of an actual Michigan "dogman" at the time of the recording:

“I made it up completely from my own imagination as an April Fools' prank for the radio and stumbled my way to a legend that goes back all the way to Native American times.”— Steve Cook, Skeptoid.com, Wag the Dogman

Cook maintains his skepticism about the possibility of a real dogman, he had this to say about the matter:

“I'm tremendously skeptical, because I've sort of seen the way folklore becomes built from the creation of this song to what it's turned into ... but I do believe people who think they saw something really did see something. I also think the Dogman provides them with an avenue to explain what they couldn't explain for themselves.”

Cook recorded the song with a keyboard backing from his friend Bob Farley. After the song aired, Cook received calls from listeners who said that they had encountered a similar creature. In the next weeks after Cook first played the song, it was the most-requested song on the station. He also sold cassettes of the songs for four dollars, and donated proceeds from the single to an animal shelter.

Over the years, Cook has received 100’s of reports about the creature's existence. In March 2010, the Dogman was featured in an episode of Monster Quest. In January 2017, the Dogman was again featured in the season 2 episode "Great Lakes: Wolfman, Dogman, Wendigo" of Monsters and Mysteries in America.

Cook said he intended the song to be an April Fool's joke but was shocked when an overwhelming number of callers shared their Dogman sightings to the station.

Cook said in an interview with CM Life “I’ve always been very interested in unknown creatures, mysterious animals, ghost stories and that sort of thing. We wanted to come up with an idea that would make a good April Fool’s prank.

I created a poem about the Michigan Dogman. The Dogman himself is sort of an algorithm of a whole bunch of different creatures, like Bigfoot, the New Jersey Devil, Chupacabra and all of those things.

I wanted it to be sort of personalized to the state of Michigan. All of this time having no idea I was actually building a character that already existed in folklore of this area for thousands of years prior to my song.’

When Steve Cook was asked if he believed in the Dogman, he replied “It’s like the UFO phenomenon. There’s a tremendous amount of evidence that UFOs exist but there’s never been an actual real, face-to-face, physical encounter that compelled me to say absolutely, that they do exist.”

After getting to meet Mr. Cook myself a few years back, I asked him why he prefers to stay away from the media attention his song still gets today, he told me that all of the stories and encounters that pop up after each appearance have just become to overwhelming and he needed to step back from this to be able to maintain everything else going on in his life.

One Dogman story reportedly involved a 13-year-old girl who had never heard of the dogman. The girl, Courtney, was sneaking a smoke behind her family’s home near Reed City, Mich. in the winter of 1993, when she noticed a glint of light coming through the planks of an abandoned barn. After watching for a few minutes, she realized a six-foot tall creature with the head of a dog was staring at her — and ran away. Later she spoke with a neighbor who claimed to have seen a buffalo-sized dog in the same barn.

Linda S. Godfrey is a Wisconsin-based author and investigator who has been looking into the existence of creatures that fit the description of dogmen, which she calls “upright canines,” since 1991. She told The Huffington Post that she’s received reports from all over the country and that Michigan — particularly the area around Kalamazoo and anywhere in the range of the state’s Manistee National Forest — has become a hotspot for creature sightings.

Linda first became interested in the subject while working as a reporter for a newspaper called the Walworth County Week. After hearing rumors about a werewolf-like creature, she wrote a story about a creature now known as the “Beast of Bray Road” which was thought to lurk in an area around Elkhorn, Wis.

The article attracted a lot of attention and, like Cook, Godfrey became a go-to person for those who wanted to share accounts of run-ins with these creatures and similar beasts. Since that time, Godfrey has written several books on the creatures and is now considered an authority on the topic in the cryptozoological community.

Although she said legends of the “Loup Garou”, a French term for werewolf, can be traced back to the late 1700s and early 1800s in older settlements like Detroit, definitive reports of upright canines didn’t really start appearing until the 1930s.

Unlike the werewolves of Hollywood movies, Godfrey said this type of creature doesn’t have human features and doesn’t transform from a person into a wolf.

“It’s fully canine, walks on its hind legs, uses its forelimbs to carry chunks of ... roadkill or deer carcasses.” she said. “They have pointed ears on top of their heads. They have big fangs. They have bushy tails. They walk — most tellingly — digitigrade, or on their toe pads, as all canines do, and that’s something that a human in a fur suit really can’t duplicate.”

Godfrey said witnesses are usually scared to death by the creatures, but after 20 years of receiving reports she can’t cite one serious injury from an alleged encounter.

She believes those who contact her are sincere but adds that she has not seen one herself and has yet to see convincing photographic proof of their existence.

Animal tracks are the best evidence Godfrey can point to as support for the existence of upright canines. She said she has a cast of a paw print from Rock County, Wis. that is more than six inches in length and width — far bigger than a timber wolf. After so much time investigating the creatures, however, she still doesn’t know what to make of the reports she receives.

She speculates the creatures could be some kind of rare, indigenous adapted canine species — a wolf-dog hybrid. There is also a more supernatural explanation for their presence. Godfrey spoke with an elder from the Ho-Chunk Native American tribe who believed they were spirit creatures from another place that assume a physical form while in our realm.


Credits: To find out more about Steve Cook’s song “The Legend” visit www.michigan-dogman.com. Linda S. Godfrey can be contacted at [email protected] Credit for parts of this story belong to HuffPost, https://www.huffpost.com/entry/michigan-dogman-upright-canine_n_2019442 and Central Michigan Life, cmlife.com and Wikipedia.

Nessie sighted again!

I found this article in my Coast to Coast AM email "Eoin O'Faodhagain was reportedly watching the live stream from his home in Ireland on Monday when he noticed an odd shape emerge from the water and seemingly swim a short distance across the lake." Apparently this is Mr. O'Faodhagain's 7th sighting of the mysterious "Nessie".

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